Special 50% off Summer Curriculum Sale!

It’s that time again to purchase new curriculum and make plans for the new school year! We want to help you with our special 50% off Summer Curriculum Sale!

Be on the look out for a new ebook series to you assist you in teaching science, coming soon!

Here are the links to the discounted sale prices in our sale:

Make Your Own ABC Book About … Ancient Greece e-book :

Make Your Own ABC Book About ... Ancient Greece

Normally $1.99, now $1.00

Buy Now

Make Your Own ABC Book About … Christmas :

Make Your Own ABC Book About ...Christmas

Normally $1.99, now $1.00

Buy Now

Make Your Own ABC Book About … Thanksgiving :

Make Your Own ABC Book About ...Thanksgiving

Normally $1.99, now $1.00

Buy Now

Make Your Own ABC Book About … The Human Body :

Make Your Own ABC Book About ...The Human Body

Normally $1.99, now $1.00

Buy Now

Make Your Own ABC Book About … The Middle Ages :

Make Your Own ... ABC Book About the Middle Ages

Normally $1.99, now $1.00

Buy Now

Summer Nature Study and More :

Summer Nature Study and More

Normally $6.50, now $3.25

Buy Now

Having Fun with Shakespeare for Kids and Teens :

Fun with Shakespeare for Kids and Teens

Normally $9.95, now $5.25

Buy Now

Spring Nature Study and More :

Spring Nature Study and More

Normally $6.50, now $3.25

Buy Now

Winter Nature Study and More :

Winter Nature Study and More

Normally $6.50, now $3.25

Buy Now

Autumn Nature Study and More :

Autumn Nature Study and More

Normally $6.50, now $3.25

Buy Now

Using Nature Study, Nature Journals, and Poetry Through the Year :

Nature Study, Nature Journals, and Poetry Through the Year

Normally $14.95, now $7.50

Buy Now

Insects: A Unit Study Using Charlotte Mason Methods :

Insects: A Unit Study using the Charlotte Mason Method and More

Normally $14.95, now $7.50

Buy Now

Make Your Own ABC Book About … The Animal Kingdom :

Make Your Own ABC Book About ...The Animal Kingdom

Normally $1.99, now $1.00

Buy Now

Audio Workshop Set: You Can Make Your Own Unit Study Using Charlotte Mason Methods
(This link leads you to the Currclick website with a discounted price of $14.95, normally $29.95)

Audio Workshop Set:You Can Make Your Own Unit Study Using Charlotte Mason Method

Shop now and grab these prices before they are gone for the curriculum planning season! Thanks for your past purchases! We appreciate your business! Have a great summer and brand new school year!

Enter for Giveaways at Notebooking pages Tonight!

Notebooking Pages is at it again! They are having another two hour giveaway tonight, Tuesday the 20th from 7-9 EST.

Enter by clicking on this link – 8th Birthday Sale-A-Bration Giveaways

 

 

Prizes include $25 Amazon.com gift cards plus Charlotte Mason Style Daily Lesson Plans for One Year from Train Up a Child Publishing, the Ultimate Naturalist’s Library from the Handbook of Nature Study, &  Customized Planners from MomsToolBelt.com

We’re Participating in a Prize Giveaway with Notebooking Pages Sale-a-bration!

Notebooking Pages has extended their lifetime membership special sale through Mother’s Day, May 11th now for only $50, plus bonus gifts:

Membership Sale Details:
Notebooking Pages LIFETIME Memberships are …$50.00 (savings of $49.95).
All new members who sign up during our Sale-a-Bration will receive these two bonuses:
Bonus 1: All new members will receive 2 years access to The Notebooking Publisher.
Bonus 2: All new members will receive a $100+ homeschooling e-gift package.

And we are participating in a Prize Giveaway on May 6th! You can enter to have a chance of winning 1 of 3 prize giveaways plus a $25 Amazon gift card!

We have contributed our HUGE Audio Workshop set – You Can Make Your Own Unit Study Using Charlotte Mason Methods. This is a combination workshop set including hours of audio files, workshop handouts, and slideshows. You will learn about Charlotte Mason methods, writing your own unit study and using Charlotte Mason methods in a unit study! That’s 3 workshops in 1! A value of $29.95! Check it out here.

Purchase your lifetime membership now at the discounted rate and receive your bonuses AND get a chance to win one of these three prizes – hopefully mine!

 

Using Notebooking Pages in our Homeschool

We use our notebooking pages in a variety of ways. We include them in our nature studies and make nature journals with them. We use them for copywork and dictation when we follow Charlotte Mason methods. We have had the most fun using them to learn to write essays about what we are learning during a unit study.

We have traveled back to the Middle Ages as scribes in a monastery and illuminated our notebooking pages with different colored glittered gel pens as we wrote an alphabet book about the Middle Ages. We then sewed the pages together with a large tapestry needle and tapestry thread just like the scribes. We made these kinds of notebooks for various time periods of study and tied them into unit study with books, crafts, projects, plays, and even feasts! Make Your Own ABC Book About…the Middle Ages

HPIM0221         HPIM0222    Our Medieval Feast   HPIM0563.JPG

After your children have become comfortable with their oral narrations of what they have heard you read or what they have read, they should be ready to try written narrations after some of their oral narrations. You don’t have to have a written narration after every reading and oral narration. We usually write down the most interesting topics to us or what I may feel are the major or most important ideas, events, or people in our study.

When your children are very young, younger than 8, 9, or 10, (Charlotte Mason and other Charlotte Mason homeschoolers begin written narration around 10.) you can do the written narration for your child. Do you remember from your school days, those big pieces of flimsy tan paper with big lines and dashes in the center, with a big empty space on top for a picture? And, you would practice writing your words and sentences with those fat pencils and then when you were done, you got to draw or paint a picture of your story? Well, with written narration for your youngest child, you can have him orally narrate his read aloud to you, while you write his words down for him. When he is done, he can draw a picture or pictures to go along with his story. You, then, read his story to him as point to each word you are reading. This will connect what you are saying to each word as you say it. Read this story to him routinely and then have him read it to you. It’s okay for him to memorize it and “practice read” it to you.

My younger son wanted to be like his older brother and “write his own book” too, so he started writing his sentences down after his oral narration also. For both my sons, this was another case of forming a habit. It was slow going for both of them. But, as they stared at the ominous blank piece of paper, I would ask them to repeat to me what they had narrated to me from our read aloud only moments ago. Then I would say, “See, you have the words you want to use; now just write down the sentence you just told me.” It took them awhile to get over the intimidation of that blank piece of paper even though they had just repeated to me their oral narrations. First, your children might only be able to write down one or two sentences the first few times they have to write down their narrations. But, just as we did, your children will grow accustomed to the idea that after narration to you, they will write down their narration on paper. You will soon see them writing five sentences, then whole pages and eventually ask for another piece of paper if it is a topic they are particularly excited about. Depending upon the topic we are reading or my sons’ interests, I may choose a notebooking page with a large space for a picture, because I know they will really want to spend time drawing their narration. Other times, if it is more dry and not as creative, I may give them a notebooking page with a simple picture already on the page or a small square where they draw a little picture of their own.

There are quite a few pages throughout the internet with blank notebooking pages, pages with specific formats or pictures depending on the topic you are studying, and pictures of completed notebooking pages you can look at to get ideas for your homeschool. You can keep these pages in some kind of notebook binder or slip the pages into sheet protectors and then put these into a notebook. Either way you have something of a keepsake and study guide of your year together. Your child has something he can look back at and be proud of, and you have something you can use in a portfolio assessment at the end of the school year if you are required to do that in your state.

For middle and high schoolers and narration, their oral and written narration can go beyond just retelling and summarizing what they have read. This is where their writing can really come naturally from their oral narration and their writing gets interesting. You can have them write different forms of essays in response to their reading, just as they would need to on any exam they take for college admission or in college. Great preparation! They can write descriptive narrations of what they have read, personal narrations – even taking on the role of a character in history, science or a literary piece they have just read. What about a compare/contrast paper between two books or other literary selections they have completed? Or a process paper after reading a book or two on a topic of interest to them. ( My son is constantly reading books and magazines about fishing – his summer is going to be spent putting a book together with everything he has learned as a 4-H project.) What about a definition paper? Start out by defining a word as it means to him or the dictionary and explore in detail what that word or concept really means through detail and examples if you have read a book about democracy for example, or courage, or faith. Are you getting the idea. I find, though, the key for my guys, including my oldest, is to let them tell me about it first. Let them organize their thoughts out loud and bounce ideas off you – even if you don’t speak and they can hear their ideas out loud. Their ideas flow much better in this informal situation before sitting down in front of that ominous blank piece of paper.

You will soon notice, as I do, that your children will be unconsciously narrating to themselves as they read to themselves or after you have read something to them. My guys will have conversations between themselves, without me or my prompting, about what we have been reading. Or, like my younger son did today, while he was reading his science book (Exploring Creation with Astronomy) to himself, he was actually narrating what he was reading back to himself – but in a song he made up- while he was reading it. These are moments that will definitely make you smile and you know that you are doing something right!

Thanksgiving and Black Friday Weekend Sale Now Online

Happy Thanksgiving! I want to thank you for your support these past couple of years – your visits to my blog, your comments of encouragement, and your purchases of my products! Thank you and I hope you all have a blessed Thanksgiving with your friends and family!

All  of our ebooks are now 50% off now through Sunday night! Please take a look at our ebooks priced from $1.00 – $7.48, normally priced at $1.99 – $14.95! The lowest prices ever!

Look on the right side of our web page at the list of all available ebooks and click on the ebook you wish to learn more about. This will take you to a description and a shopping cart button if you wish to purchase that title!

Thanks again!

Katie

Psalm 95:1-6
“O come, let us sing unto the LORD: let us make a joyful noise to the rock of our salvation. Let us come before his presence with thanksgiving, and make a joyful noise unto him with psalms.

Special Thanksgiving and Black Friday Sale!

We are having our very first Thanksgiving and Black Friday sale! This sale will run from Thursday, Thanksgiving Day through Sunday! So, if you take a break from the kitchen and start shopping on Thanksgiving, our sale will have already started!

All of our curriculum will be 50% off for the first time ever!

AND we will be introducing a new ABC Book for the 2012 elections, and you will have the opportunity to purchase it at 50% off!

We hope that this sale allows you the opportunity to  purchase some items that you have been hoping to acquire for your homeschool!

Remeber to come back here at the end of the week to grab your specially priced items!

Happy Thanksgiving!

Katie

Middle Ages and Human Body E-Books!

Well, we’ve been very busy! We have a number of projects in the works right now and have finished two of the smaller ones at the moment!

Have you been looking for a fun, creative, and effective way to research or review what you have learned about the middle ages or the human body? We have the solution for your family!

ABC books are not just for little kids anymore! We have created two books that have 5 different kinds of notebooking pages for each letter of the alphabet with various letter fonts, borders, and line spacing. Young and old alike can make their own books and have a portfolio of their learning and work when they are finished.

You can illuminate the book about the middle ages just like the monks in the monasteries or style your human body book after the classic Grey’s Anatomy or write in rhyming verse like Dr. Seuss or prose like Ogden Nash. Each book supplies you with some ideas of using the alphabet pages and an extensive list of topics for each letter from which to choose to write your alphabet pages for each theme.

Make Your Own ABC Book About… the Middle Ages

Introductory Price $1.99

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Make Your Own ABC Book About… The Human Body

Introductory Price $1.99

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Spice up your studies and written narrations, notes, or research with these notebooking pages that will help your child become an author of their own book in no time! We did and this was my kids’ favorite activity for the year!

Our Charlotte Mason Version of the Middle Ages

(Sign up now for Katie’s Homeschool Cottage newsletter for a chance in a drawing to win a free full e-book, about Nature Study, Nature Journaling, and Poetry.  One will be given away and announced the day we release this e-book. You’re going to love this one! It’s almost completed and I can’t wait to start using it with my own two boys!)

Whew! We just finished studying the middle ages and just like with every era we complete, we had ourselves a wonderful feast. We’ve been Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, and last night we had Britons and Franks at our table. In case, you wanted to explore the middle ages using Charlotte Mason’s methods and adding some more fun to it to make it living history, I thought I’d share with you what my family did.

The foundation of our reading was based on the books The Story of the Middle Ages, Story of the World, and the Child’s History of the World. From these readings, we would orally narrate and then make notebooking pages. For our family read together time, we enjoyed reading aloud A Door in the Wall and Adam of the Road for two stories to get the feel of the time period from a child’s perspective and attain some background knowledge of what life was like. While reading A Door in the Wall, we came to the part where the author discussed the monastery and the monks illuminating their scripts, so we decided to be monks. Aside from copying and transcribing Bible passages, we decided to make an alphabet book about the middle ages. We wrote down 3 or more words associated with the time (people’s names, events, things, places) next to a list of the alphabet starting with each letter. We then made a fancy looking letter at the top corner of 26 pages, one for each letter of the alphabet. Looking at some examples of illuminated pages in some fairy tale type books at home and the Book of Kells on the internet, we started putting decorative borders around the edges and coloring the large letter and the borders with rich colors, including gold, silver, red, green, glittery gel pens.

The pages were now ready to be written on a topic starting with that letter. A couple of times per week the boys would sit down with stacks of books on various topics about the middle ages we would get from the library and read. They would discuss with me what they learned and then write a summary about it for their alphabet book on the correct alphabetical page and then draw a picture in a picture box for their book. When they were all done, we took an extra large piece of paper to fold it over in half and with one of us holding the book pages tight against the fold, the other took a tapestry needle with off white tapestry thread and sewed the book binding, just like the monks. Afterward they practiced calligraphy (as close as they could get) to write the title of their books.

My older son is still finishing listening to Ivanhoe and reading A Connecticutt Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, laughing outloud while he reads and telling his younger brother what just happened.

For copywork, my younger son wrote down passages from A Door in the Wall, and my older son (a big Hobbit and Lord of the Rings fan) decided he would choose elaborate passages from those books. The boys also studied the history of chess and read about each piece, its history, and strategies to use when using that piece. This was a wonderful book called Illustrated Chess for Children with lots of interesting information for the names of the chess pieces, their moves, and strategy of the game. Alot of pictures helped the boys follow along with the discussion. They would read and play a chapter at a time.

We also enjoyed Howard Pyle’s King Arthur and Merry Tales of Robin Hood. We read Beowulf and The Song of Roland. We haven’t gotten to Sir Gawain and the Green Knight yet, but we will. We enjoyed a children’s version of The Canterbury Tales and read Chanticleer and the Fox, after reading Saint George and the Dragon. That book has some wonderful illuminations in it.

We looked at David Macaulay’s books, Cathedral and Mosque, among other titles to get a feel for art and architecture and the spread of different cultures and beliefs of the time. Each of my boys chose a person to read books about and write a research paper on – one chose Kublai Khan, the other chose King Richard the Lion-Hearted. They also read aloud a biography on Marco Polo and we mapped the Silk Road.

We would periodically stop and put time line figures on a very long roll of butcher paper, one for each boy, that we made into timelines we have been working on for several years. We add to it every year. The top half of the line is for the history of the Western Hemisphere. The bottom half of the timeline is for the Eastern Hemisphere. This way we can see what is happening concurrently on different sides of the world in a chronological manner.

We enjoyed watching a video by Sister Wendy on the art of the period and listened to various kinds of medieval music and chants.

We also listened on CD to several G A Henty stories for this period which have always been a hit with us. We were fortunate enough to see the extensive collection of armor, including samurai warriors, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. That is going to have to be a repeat visit some day.

We did an extensive study of knights, chivalry, their crests and their meanings. This led us to what crests do our family surnames have. We did a search and conducted family interviews to learn more about our family’s history. We found the correct crests for each half of the family, found out the meanings behind the names and symbols on the crests, and we put this information and the pictures on notebooking pages. The boys, of course, wanted to invent their own crests and meanings after that and then wrote out a descriptive paragraph of their respective kingdoms that led to the creation of their crests.

Being boys, they enjoyed a study of the weaponry and their uses of the time and the role of the castle.

After a study of the crusades and why they happened, we wound down our study and got ready for our feast. The boys read books on the feasts, so they would have the proper mannerisms, food, and entertainment for the occasion. They prepared a play (which wasn’t a miracle or mystery play like they would have had at the time about a Bible story) but one based on Beowulf which they had enjoyed reading so much. We prepared bannock bread, mentioned in A Door in the Wall, beef stew, and blueberry pie, served with a fruit and cheese platter with grape juice in goblets. The stew was served on bread trenchers as was the custom at the time with each setting having a finger bowl and a cloth napkin. My husband was a bit surprised when he sat down and found out he had a wooden spoon and a dull knife with which to eat and was told not to talk about any electronic devices or he would be regarded with suspicion as being a sorcerer. Everyone had to speak with thine, thy, and thou. As my sons, in a king and a knight costume, sat by candlelight at the table, they discussed who was really in charge, the Britons or the Franks.

After dessert was served, my husband narrated a lively rendition of Beowulf as the boys acted it out, changing costumes several times. Thus, the middle ages has ended and we are entering the Renaissance and the Age of Exploration with great expectation of what we will read, learn, and who we will become this time. I know we will be recreating some of Leonardo DaVinci’s inventions and lying on our backs under the kitchen table painting the next Cystine chapel for starters.

 

Our Medieval Feast

Our Medieval Feast

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